GSA Fleet Desktop Workshop: GSA Automotive Comment Collector

GSA Fleet Desktop Workshop: GSA Automotive Comment Collector


>>Welcome, everyone. We have a pretty good size
group on the phone today. Again, I’m John Hampson,
I’m the Branch Chief for Vehicle Engineering. And, very great place to work. We have six engineers that support all the
vehicle specifications and standards that
are out there. We have about 250 active
standard items numbers, and now to be, they’re
available to be purchased. So, it’s quite a task, and
the engineers really do all the work. And, but it’s a great program. So, thank you for joining. We, we have gotten some feedback
at FedFleet and other events that what’s this comment
collection that I hear so much about, and
how can it help me, and how can I provide feedback? So, we, that’s why
we set this up. We’re doing another one
tomorrow, and again, there’ll be available. And, feel free to contact
myself for vehicle buying. We got contacts at the
end of the session. To learn more or
ask any questions after today’s sessions,
after today’s session. So, a lot of you are probably
familiar with Autochoice and federal standards, and there’s so much
great information. I’m going to touch on those a
little bit, and then we will, we’ll write into the
Comment Collector. Again, thanks for
joining, and Stacy, I think if I just do page down. Let’s see here. Arrow over, Stacy? Want to make sure I’ve.>>Yes, John. I had trouble getting to
my own mute button there. But.>>Okay. No worries.>>Yeah, so the arrows on the
bottom right of your screen, you can use those to control it.>>Got it. Thank you, Stacy.>>Sure.>>Okay. What is the
Comment Collector? The Comment Collector,
it’s a module of Autochoice that allows interested parties to input comments regarding the
federal vehicle standards 45 days during certain
parts of the year, depending on which vehicles
are in which contract phase. And, we’ll talk a
lot more about that. Every category of vehicles
has federal vehicle standards associated with them. Not every particular SIM
or standard item number, but for example, light
trucks are a group, and so, as we go through
here, hopefully, that’ll give you some good
basic knowledge about it. A lot of you are pretty
familiar with this. Just to give you an idea
of the numbers here. The rules of the road is a, is
the email that, message system that goes out through
Autochoice. We have about 13,000 people
that get those emails, so we, quite a big group there. And, if you’re not
registered in Autochoice, I recommend you get registered. And, you can, you’ll get all
the rules of the road messages, and those, and particularly
important are vehicle closeouts and the opening of the
vehicle, of standards and Comment Collector. Everything else that
goes along with it. So, we’ll talk about that a
little bit today, too, as well. Okay. The federal vehicle
standards, you’re going to hear a lot about this, and you probably are
very familiar with this. Each year, the engineering
staff set up a vehicle standards for a, for about seven or
eight different product lines. And, we’ll show you those,
and for example, light trucks which probably have 30 to 40
different standard item numbers, have one federal standard
that they fall under. So, if you, if you even
just google federal vehicle standards, you will get this
vehiclestandard.fas.gsa.gov, and that will welcome you in. And, you will see the year. In fact, you can even go back
approximately ten years and look at the standards for about
the last ten years or so. And, as you go into
federal vehicle standards, you also see the
message down there which you can see down there. It talks about the
comment period being open from April 4th or
through May 18th. The Comment Collector is
designed to provide feedback for the federal standards,
and even down to the options and the minimum specifications
in the federal standards. Again, you can see the second
bullet there is how you get to the standards. Basically, what we do
each year is we bring over the minimum standards from
the last year which became final as the contract went into place. And then, they become the draft
standards for the next year. And, they are modified based on
vehicle availability, options, and feedback from the
Comment Collector. Okay. I talked about
the grouping of vehicles that have a vehicle standard
associated with them. You can, it’s probably a
little small, the font here, but if you look here,
you can see sedan and station wagons are one 122. Ambulance is 1822,
light trucks 307. And, anybody, you don’t
even need to be registered to go find these
vehicle standards. And, in fact, they have
all the contact information at the bottom, too,
vehicle buying, my email, all the information
you might need down there including the phone
number for vehicle purchasing down there at the
bottom of the page. But, as you look through here, you can see the various
standards. Of course, the standards
that impact the majority of our vehicles are
307 light trucks and the 122 sedan
and station wagon. And then, everything
else is covered. We got ambulances, heavy
trucks, medium truck, medium heavy busses, law
enforcement, and all that. So, great information, and
these typically are probably 50 to 100-page documents and get
into a lot of information. They talk about what
the options are, and you’ll find better
explanation. There’s only so much we can
have in Autochoice associated with each, with each option. So, whether it’s remote
keyless entry, remote start, whatever it might be, you
can find clarifications and information on those options
in the, in those acronyms in the federal standards. So, I recommend you get familiar
with those and spend some time. Really, whether you’re
purchasing customer or a leasing customer, this is,
it’s good information to have. Okay. For those of you that
are registered in Autochoice, and in particular
purchase your own vehicles, and a lot of leasing
folks have this as well. You can, you can go in here, and
for example, I’ve pulled up 9C which is compact sedan. And, I wanted to go over a few
things here, and you do need to request a login to be
able to get into Autochoice. What I wanted to
show here were a few, the various tabs across the top. So, once we’ve pulled up, say,
the 9C which is under sedans and station wagons, you can
see the minimum requirements, and you can scroll
down the screen here. You can see the passenger
compartment volume, trunk volume, wheel base,
curb weight, all these items. And, some of them, we have
minimum standards for. Some of them we don’t. but, everything is, all
the information is provided by the manufacturer, so
you can have a rough idea of where this vehicle
will get you, what the capabilities
are of these vehicles. I’d also like to point out
the fact that it’s good to go across the tabs at
the top here and look at all the tabs including the
option tabs, compare prices, other features, clarifications,
and emissions, and even vendor performance. The clarifications
tab is very important because it helps clarify things. Just an example, disabled
daytime running lights. The, each manufacturer
may have a different mode of operandum there for disabling
daytime running lights. And, that will describe
how their system works. So, use all the information
in there. Engineers and the auto makers
have gone to great lengths to clarify this information
for you and make it, make it user friendly. And so, really, at
the end of the day, we want you to get the vehicle
you need to perform the mission that you need to have performed. That’s the bottom line. Whether it’s a small
sedan or the biggest over the road tractor
trailer, it needs to, it needs to perform the
mission you need it to perform. Again, as I just
mentioned there, look at the minimum
requirements, the options, clarifications, in particular. Don’t overlook any of those
tabs as you go through here. Okay. Comment period. The comment period is actually, and even the federal
standards are not fleet, it’s not a concept
that’s only used in fleet. In fact, GSA has
federal standards for many different items, and
the, and federal standards in general have a comment period that is a mandated
comment period. And, that’s where
this comes out of. And, it’s, the idea
is to give the users and the contractors
the opportunity to comment on these standards. And so, you can see here that this is their federal
product descriptions is actually what they’re called, and the
preparing activities responsible for circulating these. And then, giving time
for people to comment on. That’s where this comes from,
and it’s much, goes much deeper than motor vehicles
and covers lots of different products
that GSA offers. Okay as I mentioned, these are
the vehicle classifications. Each one of these has
its own standard, and so, you can go through here. And, when you comment in
the Comment Collector, you can comment either
directly on the vehicle standard which would, for example, be the 122 which is
sedans and station wagons. You can comment directly on
that document, or you can go in to a particular standard item
number, for example, the 9C, and comment on various
things in there. It could be trim level. It could be whatever
it might be. Tilt steering wheel. Whatever you feel the
need to comment on. Now, I do ask, an engineer, one of those six engineers will
address every single comment. And, with thousands
of users and hundreds of standard item numbers, it’s
important that you comment on things that are
technically relevant and important to your mission. You know, just, you know, the
fact that you like the look of a certain vehicle
isn’t something that should be commented on. We want to talk about salient
characteristics and technical, technical characteristics
of the vehicles that help us better spec
out the vehicle and ensure that the end user gets
the vehicle that they need to perform the mission that
they need it to perform. Okay. How do you find
this comment collector? Well, you go into Autochoice,
go under links, and if you look over on the left, you can
see, again, all the types of groupings of vehicles that
I was talking about, sedans, station wagons, light trucks,
cab and chassis, all those. And, go over to links, drop
down to vehicle standards and Comment Collector. Once you get in here, you’ll find that there
are three different kinds of comments you can
offer, general comments, standard item comments,
and documentation comments. Frequently, we will
get a general comment from an automaker which
may be providing a comment on a whole group of
light duty pickups or maybe all their sedans
or something like that. And, they will just have
one comment for all the, all the SIMs involved. In other, some cases,
the contractor or the automaker will
go through and enter it for each standard item number. Either way, an engineer is
going to have to go through and respond to all
the comments that are in the Comment Collector. Okay. So, we’ve now gone into
the Comment Collector, and we, what I want you to look for is
the blue, blue square over here by trim level on the left. You’ll see a blue rectangle. If you click there, that’s where you have the
ability to make a comment. So, anywhere you see
that, and this maybe I’d like more clarification, I
need more gross vehicle weight. Whatever it might be, you can
click in there, make a comment. Again, please, please respect
the fact that every one of these has to be
fielded by an engineer and keep your comments
professional and technical and revolving around salient
characteristics of the vehicle. Just because you may not
like a particular brand or you love a particular
brand doesn’t, isn’t really technically
related to the vehicle. We want to know what
it is you need about a particular vehicle type. Whether it’s bed length, gross vehicle weight,
whatever it might be. So, that’s what,
that’s what we need. That’s what your comments
should go back to. They should revert
back to a standard or a particular standard
item number. And, they are helpful to us. We’ve had feedback over
the years that a lot of people didn’t know what
the Comment Collector was, and that’s why we
set up a couple of desktop live workshops. And so, this is an
opportunity, and this was sent out to all the Autochoice,
all the Autochoice folks that are registered
in Autochoice and also a mass email
that fleet has, too. So, we are glad you’re
on the call. We welcome your feedback. Again, like I say, just keep
it technical and relating to a particular product
and things like that. And, it’s all helpful. So, now, when you click
down there in the blue, in the blue box, this is
what’s going to come up. It’s going to say, “Enter your
comment here,” and you’re going to enter your comment here and click submit
right there below it. And, we appreciate
your feedback. This is an opportunity
for you to ask questions or provide feedback
on particular product and the standard that will drive that solicitation
for that product. For example, right now, the light duty solicitation
is ongoing, and the cut, the around July 1, the request
for proposals will go out. And, in the meantime, we will
be developing the standards and working with the, working
with the particular vehicles that are offered by
the manufacturers, establishing the list of
vehicles and the standards for next year for
the 2019 vehicles. Great stuff. It’s fun stuff. We, our goal is to make sure
you have the products you need to perform the mission that
you need to have performed. Who can use the Comment
Collector? Well, current vendors, new
vendors, vehicle purchasers, fleet managers, fleet employees. You register for
login in Autochoice, and many of you already
have that. Maybe probably the vast
majority of you do, and you can leave
your comments there. An engineer will address
each and every one of them. When is the Comment
Collector open? The Comment Collector is open
this spring from April 4th to May 18th for light duty
and vocational programs. The Comment Collector
is open at other times for other programs as well. These are the two solicitations
that are underway right now, and so, that’s, and
they also happen to be the vast majority
of our vehicles. So, that’s where we get
most of our comments. So, feel free to go in
there, make some comments, and provide feedback for us. And, an engineer
will address them. Again, keeping technical and
we want to get you the vehicles that can perform the
mission you need performed. Okay. How can the
Comment Collector help me? Well, for purchasing
and leasing customers, Comment Collector can help
them provide the engineering and purchasing teams
with the information that will help them
better spec out vehicles. Whether it’s alternative
fuels, vehicle type, bed length, you name it. Maybe you’re looking
for a compact pickup with an eight-foot bed. We may or may not be
able to get it for you. Probably can’t, but
if you put the comment in there, we can address it. And, we can see what
we can do for you. It’s a direct line of
feedback to the engineers, and much of the feedback
comes in from the auto makers as they ask questions and update
products and things like that. But, it’s all valued feedback. Manufacturers benefit
by asking questions that will help them better
represent their products. Again, as I mentioned
over and over again. Please provide specific,
productive comments relating to a particular standard
or minimum requirement. Comments should be technical
in nature and refer back to technical aspects in
the vehicle standards. You know, not, “My
favorite car is a Ford,” or “I’m only going
to drive Chevy.” Things like that are not
technically relevant, and as you’re aware,
we’re trying to find technically
acceptable and best value. So. Final thoughts. The federal standards
are designed to ensure vehicles can
perform the required missions, and we have vehicles, everything
from compact sedans to, you know, electric vehicles, all types of alternative fuel
vehicles, wreckers carriers, four different types of busses,
heavy vehicles that are capable of way over the 80,000 pounds. We’ve got off road vehicles. We’ve got everything you
can imagine, and vehicles that are designed to
carry tremendous load. So, we pride ourselves
in offering the vehicles that you need to
perform your mission. With that, Stacy, let’s. I’ve covered most of the
material that I was hoping to cover in the slides. Let’s open it up for
questions and go from there. So, if you want to key it
in or, Stacy, I’ll let you. I’ll let you bring
up the questions. You’re better at
that portion than me.>>Sure thing. So, what I’ll do is, the
questions that are coming to Q and A already, we’ve
only had a couple. And, one I knew the answer. But, we’ll go ahead and ask
it aloud to the group as well because I think it’s a good one. But, the first question is, and this is actually something
I have never fully understood. So, I’m excited that
somebody asked it. What does “comply” really
mean when that’s what’s listed as sort of the manufacturer’s
response to a standard?>>Okay. Good question. Good question. For example, if our minimum bed
length was 5.5 and a half feet or say five feet five
inches, and they put “comply”, that means they’re at least
five feet five inches or five and a half feet, however
we have it defined. good question. So, they’re basically complying
with our minimum standard. [ Multiple Speakers ]>>Go, keep going. Sorry, John.>>I was going to say
you’ll find situations where a manufacturer
requests an exception, and that’s why it’s good to
read everything carefully. And, occasionally, you’ll
find an exception requested in there and granted. Now, I can only see like
the first three words of the question, Stacy.>>Yeah, if you, if you
click on it, it’ll expand that one open for you.>>Okay.>>And then, if you click
it again once you’re done, it’ll collapse it down. But, I can read them aloud,
too, just to make sure that gives you a little
bit more time to think about an answer as
well, I guess. But, to make sure that
everybody can hear okay, hear. Because they can’t see
the questions either. So, Kevin asked, “Is the intent
that the comments should apply to all vehicles within a
given category, or, you know, to a subset or a
specific vehicle?”>>It could be either one. It truly could be either one. It depends on what
the question is.>>Right. Okay. So, then, he followed
up with an example. They need a minimum amount
of ground clearance of, say, you know, 12 inches in
certain circumstances but not all circumstances. So, would they go in for
each standard item number where they’d need
that to comment that? Or, could they do, like a
general one and say, you know, “This comment applies to, you
know, the following SIMs,” or something like that? What would be the
preferred way to enter that type of a comment in?>>Right. The best, you
know, the best thing to do would be probably
each standard item number. Each standard item number.>>Okay. [inaudible]
asked, “Is the small amount of time the comments are open
really make this a valuable tool to ask questions and
get a proper response?”>>Well, one thing we
need to keep in mind, too, is that everything is on a, everything is on
a tight timeframe. The automakers can only
introduce their 2019 products so early, and then, they can
only start introducing their 2019 products so early. We can only get the
requests for proposals out on the street so early. The idea is to have at least our
light duty products available for purchase around October 1. So, if you reverse engineer it,
it literally drives it backwards to right about now when
the Comment Collector has to be open. And, we feel that, you know,
the 45 days is something that happens every year, and it’s an opportunity
once folks are used to when they can ask the
questions, they can get in there and do it in that 45 days. And, we can’t just have
questions hanging in forever. By July 1, you know, it’s gone
through the engineering team, and it’s gone through
contracting. And, there’s a request for
proposal on the street. So, whether they’re asking for
a, you know, a ten wheeled car or whatever it might be, it’s
hit the street by July 1. So, the comment collector can
only have a limited lifespan. It can’t stay open much
longer than it is in order for folks to respond to it.>>That makes sense. So, Gene asked, “What
about off road, field-based vehicles needed
for, for USFS research? I often have to spend
a lot of time and money to outfit a GSA pickup for
our needs and mission.”>>Sure. Good point. We do have some products, and
probably the best we’ve had in a while between the,
just as a couple of example. The Ford Raptor, the Chevy
Colorado, I think it’s a ZL2. It’s its on SIM, and it has
a significantly more off road oriented suspension. And, the Jeep Rubicon. We offer all those,
and somewhere between those three,
you may get closer. Not sure where you’re starting
or, well, you said a pickup. So, you’re probably
looking at a Rubicon or the Colorado ZL2,
I believe it is. Which is pretty good
off-road characteristics on either one of those vehicles. We certainly, we were limited by what the manufacturers
will provide. We’re buying commercial off
the shelf, but any, you know, in this case, you can’t
really buy anything more. I see somebody down
there has a ZR1, right? ZR1. Between the Colorado
ZR1 and the Raptor, those are the best that the
industry really provides now as far as pickup. Oh, we also have the Ram
Power Wagon which is, has pretty good off-road
characteristics as well.>>Okay. So, William asked,
“Are there any reference sources that might show pictures
or diagrams of the different
styles and/or options?”>>In some cases,
you will see some. It depends what’s provided
by the manufacturer. We, and it also depends
on how much space we have. We are in the process of
modernizing all these tools, and so, it does depend on
what the manufacturer provides as well. You know, a lot of cases,
we get in there when we can, but we’re limited space wise. And, another thing
you can do, also, for the commercially available
products like the Raptor or something like
that is you can go on your own and look at it. But, we always recommend
something as critical that you take a careful
look at the standards, because the vehicles isn’t
always exactly as they offer at the, to the public. Typically, it will be very
close, but not always.>>Okay. So, I’m jumping down
to Gene’s additional comments because I think they’re
all sort of connected. So, he says, “Related issues
are, you know, ground clearance, quality tires, good plates,”
and then, he also asked, “What about truck bed toppers?”>>Truck bed toppers, I
think, are typically not, at least for the pickups,
vocational and things like that, different world. But, for pickups, I don’t think
many manufacturers are really offering a truck bed topper. That’s something you’ll
handle on your own. You can, you know, after
you get the pickup, lots of toppers are
available, and you can work. If it’s a lease vehicle, work
with your fleet folks on that, and if it’s your own vehicle,
you know, just take a look and see what’s out there. All kinds of toppers
are available for them.>>Okay. Shirley asked, “In
the case of an ambulance, if the FSR sees a benefit to add
an option or suggest something that assists the agency
in the daily operation, what can we supply
to help the engineer to understand what
it is we are asking? Does it have to be provided
to all SIMs, or can we ask for it on just one SIM?”>>Certainly, could come
down to just one SIM. It really depends on what kind
of option we’re talking about. Certainly, John McDonalds is
the ambulance engineer, and, but feel free just to go to
vehicle buying, and, well, on the next slide, you’ll
have vehicle buying’s email. You can go to them or
go to me, and I’ll, and we’ll bring John
in on the discussion. We have a true ambulance expert. John McDonald has, was,
worked for D.C. governments, specked them out for D.C.
government for years, and now he’s done it
for us for many years. In fact, he has a standard,
an ambulance spec that’s used by more than half the
states out there, so we, ambulances are very important. We want to, we want
your feedback on it, and either to talk to the FSR
and/or the customer directly. Not sure I answered that,
but we can, we’ll take care of whatever we can do for you.>>Okay. So, lift gates. Where would, where would, okay. Where would they go to verify
specific specs like deck size when they’re making selections?>>Yeah, that’s a good question. When you get into, when you
get into the vocationals and the mediums, the medium duty
trucks, there tends to be a lot of interaction back and forth with the engineer
and the contractor. You may or may not get
everything you need out of the specs, and you know,
and that’s when, that’s when we, especially with products
like that, we welcome the interaction
between, between maybe the FSR and the customer and the
engineer for that product. Which, probably going to be Peter Milkay
[assumed spelling] on that. So, feel free to go to me or
come in through vehicle buying. If you come in through
[email protected], they always find the right
engineer for the product. But, yeah, you, there’s a limit to how much information
we can actually put in the standards and the specs. So, in a lot of cases, there’s
a lot of back and forth. You know, you get in some
highly customized vehicles in the medium heavy world. So, we want to help out with
that, help you with that.>>Okay. This is back to
the truck bed toppers again, and he’s asking what about, and
I believe he’s, I’m not sure, actually, if he’s asking
a purchasing program to purchase the truck bed
toppers or if he’s looking for them on lease vehicles. But the, he says
when he buys one, he ends up turning it
in with the vehicle. So, that does make me think
that it’s about getting them through the leasing programs.>>Right. Since they are
typically, I mean, the bed, if you’re, I think what you’re
asking about is the, you know, the toppers that you would
put on a regular pickup. And, you know, either
five and a half or six and a half or an eight-foot bed. And, since the OEMs don’t
offer them directly, it’s not something that
we typically pass through, through the engineering program. If there was, you know, we
certainly could look into it, but that probably, that’s
going to be really a vehicle, vehicle modification outfit. And, those happen every day. We want to make sure
we can facilitate that, but engineering’s
going to stick, especially in a light
duty world, to what the manufacturers
are offering. There’s a, you know, a
long list of available after market toppers
you can put on there.>>And, if you’re asking about
sort of purchasing that or, you know, having fleet
purchase and sort of lease it through that, there
are some limits to what we are allowed to do. Some of that comes down
to dollar thresholds, but there’s some other things as
well that we have to make sure that we are working
within the laws and our mission as
an organization. But, I do know that there are,
you know, things that we work with customers on, and if we do,
if we can do the procurement, then we would add, you know, an accessory equipment
rate to your monthly rate. And, it could go that way. I mean, so that, the best
thing you could do is talk to your fleet service
rep about that need. If you don’t feel like
you’re getting an answer that really addressing
your question, you know, there’ll be that other point
of contact at the end of this. But, also, why did
I just blank on the, our generic fleet mailbox? Even our fleet underscore
[email protected] You can email there,
and we’ll get it routed to the right people to help
you understand what that, how that process is supposed
to work so that way we know, you know, do we need to get some
clarification out to our folks on how, sort of, the
aftermarket accessory side of things is supposed to work. Or, is it that we need to do
a better job of explaining that to our customers, that
way they understand it. Just sort of where the
communication needs to be, and maybe it’s something
that we can take care of. But, it may also be something
that we can’t necessarily do.>>Right. Typically, on a light
duty truck, it’s going to go from the manufacturer directly
to the marshalling site or the dealer, wherever the
vehicle’s being picked up. In most cases, the
marshalling site. So, what we’re, you know,
in some cases, you know, you see it now with low
enforcement outfits. We offer outfitted law
enforcement vehicles. They go to an outfitter. And, that’s, that’s a
whole other process. The truck toppers, typically, like Stacy said,
start with the FSR. And, we’re always
looking at volume. It’s never say never, but typically the way
the system works now for toppers is that’s going to be a modification you’re
going to make afterwards. And, there’s almost
endless supplies of toppers, the slanted one, and
ones with windows in them and various lock. And, you know, just hundreds
and hundreds of options.>>Right. And, another thing
on the fleet leasing side, too, with some of that
is, you know, we, not to say we don’t do
highly customized vehicles for customers, but there are
things that we do stay away from because it is such a
highly customized vehicle, and due to our replacement
cycle, maybe you’re really not going to
be able to get the full best use of the vehicle based
on the amount of money you had to put into it. And so, if you could own
a vehicle, maybe that’s in the taxpayer’s best interest
because you could hold onto it for a little bit longer. There may be other things
where, you know, if it’s highly, highly specialized, you know,
but if something happens and you need to turn
that vehicle in, we’ll, we aren’t going to be able
to find another home for it. So, there are some things that,
you know, sometimes we have to look at it from that
perspective as well, to make sure that we’re
kind of doing what’s in the best interest of
the taxpayer in addition. So, there are, there are some
limits to what fleet can do. There, it’s pretty,
it’s pretty broad. We can do a whole lot,
but there are some things that it’s just not
possible as well. Clinton asked, “Is
there a battery location on the vehicle specifications
for each vehicle?” You know, so where’s the
battery if they’re doing? Okay. So, he said,
“Case in point. I just had to have an
SUV battery replaced, and the battery was located
under the passenger seat. That was not cost effective
to the government due to the removal of the seat
and battery replacement that was expensive due to the
type of battery required.” I’m assuming he’s
talking specifically about a hybrid of some sort.>>Yeah. That would be right. That’d be my guess, too. That would be my guess. [ Multiple Speakers ]>>Dodge Durango, a
2013 Dodge Durango.>>Okay. Oh, interesting. Okay. That one, I’m
not familiar with. I would say, in general,
on light duty vehicles, I do not think we
specify battery location. I would have to check in
it, though, to be sure. You know, sometimes you learn
things that you don’t know. You don’t know what
you don’t know, and you don’t realize
the challenges with something like that. I don’t, I’ll have
to go back and look. I guess the answer to your
question is I’m not 100% sure on light duty. Good point, though, and
we will take note of that. And, I will mention that
to light duty engineers. That was a 2013 Durango. Obviously, not a hybrid. All right, thank you for
your feedback on that.>>So, and so, Clinton
followed up again. “It would be good to have
that information prior to ordering the vehicle.”>>Right.>>Yeah. Whether there’s a way
to work that in there or not, that’s always the big challenge,
I think, for you guys. Huh, John? [laughs]>>It is. It is.>>[inaudible] get all
the stuff detailed.>>It is, and you know,
there are thousands of parts on every vehicle, and
it’s hard to, you know. If we addressed everything that
changed from one model year to the next or one body
style to the next, it would, it would be kind
of overwhelming. And, you know, frequently, you
don’t realize the ramifications of something until you have
something like that show up. That’s an interesting one. I’m going to look into that. I’m going to look into that one.>>Well, Gary asked,
“Should an FSR be able to configure a medium
duty vocational body truck with an auto crane and a lift
gate for us before sending it to the marshalling facility,
or is that too specialized?”>>And, I assume
that’s, Gary wrote FSA. FSR. Okay, there we go. I would, I think that we
probably do configure them like that. If it’s true medium duty,
I would say the answer is that we probably do right now. But, Gary, feel free to,
feel free to reach out to us, and I’ll get more exact
information on that. And, Stacy, I put one more,
I went one more slide ahead with the [email protected]
email address on there so people can pick that up. And, of course, anybody
downloads the presentation will have that, too. But, that’s the best
address to go to. They will find either
myself or the engineer for that product line and get
you the answers that you need.>>I’m just going
to adjust the screen so that way they can see, oops.>>Oh, did I, I was
playing with it, so I could see their questions. Perhaps I changed it for them.>>And, that’s fine
because we had it on the other slide for a while. I just want to make sure that
they can see that address. But, if they’ve downloaded
the presentation, it’ll be in there, too. You’re fine. Think, let’s see. I know Devin’s been going back
and forth with somebody trying to answer because he’s had
some real detailed questions that I can’t help with. But, Devin Beckus [assumed
spelling] who’s an FSR out of Harrisburg
that helps out sort of behind the scenes
with these sessions. He’s really great when folks
have really detailed questions, specifically if they’re
fleet leasing customers. He jumps in there, and I’ll try
to help a, figure out, like, what exactly is going
on to see, you know, can he answer the question
or does he ultimately, do we need to, kind of send
it off to somebody else? So, he’s going back and forth.>>[inaudible] See
a couple more. See one on the Colorado there.>>Yeah.>>Maybe he’s already
taken that. So.>>Yeah, he is, and that’s
what I’m trying to see. I’m trying to make sure I’m
connecting all the pieces that are left in here. Okay. So, Gary just
responded back. He was the one who asked
about a vocational body truck with an auto crane
and a lift gate. And, it sounds like he
said that, you know, what they’re getting
right now is a Ford F550.>>Okay. Okay.>>And so, some of that may come down to what options are
available from the manufacturer.>>Right.>>From that standpoint, if
it’s something that we can get through the manufacturer,
in most cases, that’s what we want to do. Although, there are some
things that, in order to get it through the manufacturer
because we see this with, like, the bed liners. And which, I know that
doesn’t apply here. It’s just the one example
I can always remember. You know, somebody with a
bed liner unfortunately, if you’re dealing with
light duty pickup trucks, the only way you’re
getting a bed liner from the manufacturer
is if you’re buying that top of the line package. And so, that bed liner ends up costing you several
thousand dollars. Where, if you went and
did one aftermarket, it costs a few hundred bucks. And so, that’s one of
the scenarios where it’s in the best interest of
the taxpayer if we go ahead and do it after market. And so, Gary, with your F550, depending on what
we’re talking about, if it’s something we can get
from the manufacturer, then, depending on the specifics of,
well, what’s it going to cost to get it from the manufacturer? Are we paying for that
specific thing that you need for your mission, or are we
paying for a whole package that gives you a bunch of stuff
that you don’t have to have? So, there may be
a couple of things that are impacting whether
or not we would order it with everything or if we would, we could do some
outfits after the fact. And, again, I would say,
you know, if you’re, if you’re asking all those
questions of your FSR, and you don’t feel like
you’re getting answers that really answer
your question. Or, you feel like you still
don’t have a good understanding of what’s possible and what’s
not, and if we tell you no, why we’re telling you no. Certainly reach back out to,
whether it’s vehicle buying or our training mailbox or
any other GSA fleet point of contact that you may have. And, you know, maybe we can help
provide a different explanation that maybe will make
sense, or we can kind of help facilitate
get you a good, quality answer to
those questions.>>[inaudible] And, we can certainly bring the
engineer on that product, too. You’re getting pretty
specialized when you get into those things. So, we’re glad.>>Right.>>Glad to help out
with that, Gary.>>Okay. So, Steve asked,
“Could greenhouse gas score, for example, vehicles be part
of the minimum requirement list. Otherwise, it is an extra step
to find it on an EPA website?” So, I think what
he’s asking for is to have the greenhouse
gas score be part of the information that’s
available in the standards.>>Right. Right. And, we go, when you go,
yeah, under the emissions tab, I believe that shows
up right now. I’d have to go look at it again
to verify it, but I, yeah, I’ll circle back on it. I’ll circle back
on that one, Steve. We are, in fact, look for dramatically different
emissions information for 2019. When that comes out, it’s
going to be revamped. So, I believe that you’ll find
that in there for 2019 for sure.>>Oh, that’s awesome.>>Yeah. [inaudible].>>Another thing I’ll add about those EPA greenhouse
gas scores is particularly if the manufacturers are
rolling out a really, a redesigned model, but even
just one year to the next, if they don’t have their scores
yet from the EPA when we go, and we award contracts, or
as you’re placing orders, if they don’t have a
score for a vehicle yet, even if we have a placeholder
for it, it may not be in there. So, there may be vehicles
where even if there’s a spot, there may not be a score. And, that’s typically the
reason why I actually don’t know that I’ve ever seen one
listed for a different reason. So, you know, obviously, the manufacturers can’t
give us information that they don’t have. And, as soon as they
have it, they can go in and update the information,
and everything will be updated. But, there may be a vehicle
here and there where even if there’s a place for that
score, it may be blank. And, that’s the reason why.>>Right.>>Okay.>>Yeah, look for
dramatically improved and more expensive
emissions data this year. All right. So, where we at?>>Yeah, so I’m trying to,
I’m trying to go through and like clear stuff out
we’ve answered [inaudible]. Okay. So, Daniel asked, “SEA offers the four corner
air suspension on a Ram 1500 for the last two years. They offer it on a
website, and GSA offers it on Autochoice and AMP. However, I cut the order, and then four months later I am
told I can no longer order the four corner air suspension. Why does this happen? It frustrates customers.”>>That’s a good
question, Daniel. I’d like to check that one out. Things do occasionally change,
but you know, if it’s contracted for us, and it’s in
Autochoice, it is what it is. I have to check that one out. We’ll have to check that. That’s a 1500 air
suspension, and that was on the 2018s, obviously.>>Yeah, and John, if I
didn’t tell you this before, my apologies, but I can send you over a transcript
of this Q and A pod.>>Oh, great.>>After we’re done, so
you’ll have everything.>>Super.>>Okay. And. Okay. All right. Okay. So, we actually got
through everything that was in the Q and A box, but this
is where I ramble a bit to see. Because inevitably, when I
start to say, “Thank you all for coming,” and doing the close
out, more questions pop up. So, this is my stall
tactic to see if anything else is
going to pop in there. And, so far, nothing has. But, you do have an email
address there that you can reach out to if you do think
of any other questions. There’s a second
session of this tomorrow, so if you have coworkers
that you think, you know, this would be helpful for them or that you think
would be interested, certainly pass the
information along. They can register up
until, you know, actually, probably after it has
started, potentially. But, it would be better
if they could register at least a few minutes before. Let’s see. So, Daniel asked.>>You got it.>>Okay. So, okay. So, Daniel’s question. He’s just providing us some
more information, so we can look into it more specifically. That’s awesome. Thank you, Daniel.>>Yes, thank you.>>Okay. Catherine asked what
time is tomorrow’s session, and I believe, but I want
to make sure I get it right. So, let me check in my calendar. So, that is at 11:00
AM Eastern time. So, I don’t know what
time it is where you are, but it’s 11:00 AM Eastern is
the time of tomorrow’s session if you are looking to pass
that information along. All right.>>So, Daniel’s put
in a couple more. Are those all FCA
options, I guess?>>I believe so, based on what
he said, but we’ll be able to look back at that
transcript and try to piece it back together. And then, email him if it’s
not, if it’s still not clear, we can get together with him.>>Right.>>So, okay. It seems like everything
that’s coming in is these last
little bits of things. I’m starting to see the
thank yous popping in there, so we appreciate that. And, thank you everyone
for joining us today. Hopefully, this was helpful. And, thank you, John, for putting together
the presentation and being willing to present. I know that’s not always
easy because it’s always, in addition to everything else
that you’re trying to get done. So, I appreciate
you taking the time.>>[inaudible] Thank you, Stacy, and thanks to everybody
for being on.>>Yeah. Have a good
day, everyone.>>Thanks, everybody for.

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