How To Clean Vintage Car Interiors – Chemical Guys

How To Clean Vintage Car Interiors – Chemical Guys


Today in the Detail Garage we have 1965 Volkswagen
Notchback. If you follow our channel, we were using this vehicle during a live Google Broadcast test. We’re considering live video so you can see
what it’s like to detail a car, the timeframe that it takes, and to show you
real-life detailing. We did a live video where we polished the
car, but I wanted to make another video talking about interior detailing. Specifically: detailing an older car. This is a great car for this because it’s
hard to find an older car like this in such good condition. The whole inside of the car has been redone, so we’ll go inside and show you some tips
and tricks on how to make it look better. I want to clean up the interior of this Volkswagen. We popped back the sunroof to get more light
into the vehicle to see what else we could clean on the inside. We vacuumed it out, but I want to clean the
dash and the seats– but I don’t want to make it too clean. A lot of detailers talk about “patina.” If you’re in to show cars or custom car detailing, patina makes cars look older and gives them
more character. That doesn’t mean patina cars can’t be detailed. This car has patina, and that’s what gives
it character. There are some imperfections like rust on
the wiper blade arms. The car looks clean, but it looks old at the
same time. We want to keep that “old” looking character. One thing we want to keep on a patina car
is the interior. This interior was actually redone, so the
carpet is actually brand new and these seats were redone. These have a tweed center portion and synthetic
leather outside. I want clean it up, but I don’t want to make
it look too clean. If this were a brand new car, I’d use Leather
Cleaner on the seats, then a cloth cleaner and extractor on the
center section, then clean everything else with NONSENSE and
maybe repaint panels. On this car, I want make everything look clean, but NOT new. That’s kind of a weird thing to think about,
but when you’re detailing, it’s something we need to consider. I’m going to use just a microfiber towel and
some InnerClean. InnerClean is an interior quick detail spray. It won’t clean too much, but it’ll take off
all the fingerprints, dust, body oils, and it’s gonna make everything
look nice. Plus I can use it on all the interior parts. I’ll spray it directly on my microfiber towel, then wipe everything down. I chose InnerClean for this job because this
dashboard has some vinyl, or some type of synthetic plastic, and down
here it’s painted. With InnerClean, I can go from painted surfaces,
to plastic, and glass. We’re getting pieces of dirt! Older cars that sit around and don’t get driven
all the time, we want to make sure they’re clean! I’ll flip my towel to a clean side, spray
a little more, and I can clean the steering wheel as well. We’re not trying to clean out this off-white color, I kind of like that. The thing about older cars is some of the
materials are very sensitive. If you clean certain classic and un-restored
cars in original condition with too strong a chemical, you can often stain the plastic, the color,
stain the fabric, there’s so many ways you can hurt the interior
because they’ve already been degraded by time. I’m using InnerClean because it’s safe on
all these types of interiors. I want to clean these seats with InnerClean as well. I tested one of the seats with Leather Cleaner, but it completely restored that section and
took away the patina look! It was making it too clean! If you want to clean the interior, but not
make it too clean, you can use InnerClean. Look at this dirt that’s coming off here on
the towel. That’s all dirt, and body oils. InnerClean is not removing dyes or colors,
and it’s keeping that original look. There’s one other piece I wanted to clean
in here: the shift knob. The shift knob and steering wheel are the
two most touched parts of a car, even more so than a door handle or window switch. These are touched all the time. As you’re driving, your hand is always on
the shift knob, especially in the city. The InnerClean made them both look good! I don’t think this is the original steering
wheel or shift knob, but they look almost too good condition to
be that old. I wanted to give you a nice view of this car. The car is really cool! The door panels have a cool tweed, and it’s really interesting to detail old cars like this. You can restore a vehicle with our products. You can remove heavy dirt and debris like
from this door over here, but you don’t always need heavy cleaners for interiors. I use InnerClean on my vehicle’s interior
once a week, I just wipe everything down because it’s strong
enough to remove body oils. If I eat french fries in the car, then touch
the steering wheel, it’ll remove all that type of stuff. But InnerClean won’t leave any extra shine. There’s no shine on this dash, on the seat, it’s the original look and feel of the material. I’ll do some more detailing on this car and
have some more fun. Stay tuned for more live feeds in the future! Stay tuned to our channel! Thumb-up our videos! Subscribe to our channel. We make these videos just for you guys so
you can have fun detailing. That’s what detailing is all about: having
fun! We’ll see you in the next video. Always remember: Have fun, stay clean, and keep on detailing!

About the Author: Michael Flood

8 Comments

  1. Nice, I like it… when summer comes I'm going you buy so much product to test, use , and even show my fam. Hopefully that's 2 mil is nice and nice on your paycheck. Thanks @Chemical Guys

  2. I have a 1990 nissan 300zx, i just got it going on a year now and before that it had been sitting for about 4 years (outside, primary under a car cover) and some things are just shot and need to be replaced. But i've been trying to bring my interior back to life.
    Some of the leather on the dash have been burnt from the sun, and the brushes i've been using have been pulling my carpet up.

    Not to sure what to try, and replacing the interior is just out of my budget
    Any Tips? 

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