How To Spot A Future Classic Car

How To Spot A Future Classic Car


Classic cars go for big money these days,
with the record currently standing at $38,115,000 for a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. That’s a ludicrous amount to spend on anything
let a lone a 50-year-old car, so what gives? What makes a car so desirable as to fetch
such a seemingly exorbitant sum at auction? Rarity is obviously a factor, but the car
has to be rare for the right reasons. It’s not going to be worth anywhere near
as much if there are only a few remaining because the rest rusted away. However, if there was a limited production
run, you can be sure these cars will fetch huge sums of money at some point. The Ford Focus RS500, for example, was originally
sold for £35,000 or $48,965 in 2010 when it went on sale eight years ago; today, the
asking price for a high mileage example is more than double that, a boon for owners and
Used Car Dealers alike. In addition to the question of rarity, you
have to consider the technical significance of a car. Cars nowadays, even the most basic, can be
equipped with technology that were once reserved for the high-end luxury car segment, some
of which are truly ground breaking and others that will be scrapped in one or two model
years. When an automaker gets it right, though, the
model to first feature the innovative technology can be worth a hefty sum in the future. The BMW 2002 Turbo was the first production
car to feature a turbocharger, which rocketed it into the league of exclusive and desirable
vehicles instantly. You’ll be hard-pressed to find an example
fetching going for less than £100,000 or $139,899 anywhere. Finally, if a car has a competition heritage,
there’s a good chance that it will be worth a lot in the future. Any car with a racing pedigree is more desirable
because, for the most part, they helped shape the heritage and reputation of their respective
brands, explaining why innocuous-looking car’s like the pip-squeak 1960’s Mini rally car
can be bought now for around £30,000 or $41,900. A future and relatively affordable classic
to look out for is the Ferrari 412, a manual version of which is twice as rare as the F40
supercar and is still available for under £100,000. Also worthy of consideration are old Porsche
911 models like the 996 Turbo — they have seen their price rocket into the stratosphere
in the past few years.

About the Author: Michael Flood

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *